Rocci Stucci Media

Rabid, 55 lb Beaver Attacks, Bites Little Girl While Swimming In Lake

This weekend, a little girl in Georgia was attacked and bitten by an unusually large beaver. According to Kevin Beucker — field supervisor for Hall County Animal Control — the incident happened while the child was swimming off private property in Lake Lanier near Gainesville.

Don McGowan — supervisor for the Georgia Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Resources Division – reported that a game warden present at the scene described it as “the biggest beaver he’s ever seen,” weighing in at around 50 or 55 pounds.

The animal tested positive for rabies after it was beaten to death by the girl’s father who quickly intervened.

What are the details?

Kevin Beucker — field supervisor for Hall County Animal Control — told WDUN-AM that the beaver bit the girl Saturday while she was swimming off private property in the northern end of Lake Lanier near Gainesville, the Associated Press reported. Gainesville is about an hour and a half northeast of Atlanta.

The beaver’s bite was on the girl’s leg, WSB-TV said in an initial story, citing WDUN.

The girl’s father intervened and beat the beaver to death, Hall County Animal Control told WSB.

Don McGowan — supervisor for the Georgia Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Resources Division — said a game warden who responded to the incident described the animal as the “biggest beaver” he’s “ever seen,” the AP said, citing a follow-up WSB story.

This disturbing incident raises questions about how such wild animals should be handled under different circumstances.

Rabid animals are unpredictable and can become dangerous if provoked; however, there is no excuse for such vicious behavior against innocent bystanders, particularly children. This experience is a stark reminder of why safety should always be a priority when recreating outdoors, especially when venturing into unfamiliar territory where wildlife may reside.

The proper response to this situation is not up for debate: those who witness a rabid animal must take all necessary precautions to protect themselves and others from harm immediately.

In this case, the swift action of the girl’s father likely prevented further injury or worse – death – from occurring due to contact with an infected creature.

It is also important that parents educate their children on what to do if they come across an animal displaying signs of aggression or illness while out exploring nature – running away should always be their first instinct!

It is unfortunate that such events occur so often but they serve as reminders of how vulnerable we are when interacting with wildlife directly without taking appropriate safety measures beforehand.

Author

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
LinkedIn

4 Responses

  1. “It is also important that parents educate their children on what to do if they come across an animal displaying signs of aggression or illness while out exploring nature – running away should always be their first instinct!” Not true! If the animal is a cougar, running away may trigger an attack! So people need to consider what the animal is in their response.

    1. Don’t think a kid would have a shot at surviving a cougar, running away or not.. Best always have a friend along whether in the city or anyplace else.

  2. I have been told to keep my arms out and hands wiggling, keep eye contact, and back away slowly to show you are not running away, which makes you prey.

  3. So lemme see “RUN?” AH no, and yes if its a snake. Running away tends to incite more aggression, but running and yelling toward the animal depending on the size, yeah that scares it because now you are the aggressor. Bears, no depending on how far you are away from them there are different responses, even with hunting cats.

    BTW: How do you run in water? Just curious?

  • Decide Right

  • On Key

    Related Posts